May42014

The Atrium and Nature: Sorting through the Sorting Materials

The Atrium and Nature: Sorting through the Sorting Materials

The mother and child peeked into the atrium as I was tidying away the materials left from the kindergarten group that had just left. Peering up over her glasses, the four year old bounced up on her toes, making the large bow on her red hair tremble and slip further sideways.

“Miss Kay, I want to show my mom the book,” she whispered.

“Of course,” I replied. The little girl grabbed her mother’s…

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April142014

beingblog:

If you only listen to one thing today, let it be this. A message from Desmond Tutu that we can’t hear enough in this life.

There’s no question about the reality of evil, of injustice, of suffering, but at the center of this existence is a heart beating with love.

That you and I and all of us are incredible. I mean, we really are remarkable things. That we are, as a matter of fact, made for goodness.

(0 plays)

2AM
“I did not ask for success, I asked for wonder. And You gave it to me.” ~Abraham Joshua Heschel, a prayer from Heschel’s book of Yiddish poems remembered by a listener because of this post on failure and curiosity. (via beingblog)
2AM

“The texts that Christians typically read on Palm Sunday have become so familiar that we probably don’t sense their revolutionary power. But no first-century Jew would have missed the excitement and danger implicit in the coded language of the accounts describing Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem just a few days before his death. In Mark’s Gospel we hear that Jesus and his… disciples ‘drew near to Jerusalem, to Bethphage and Bethany on the Mount of Olives.’ A bit of trivial geographical detail, we might be tempted to conclude. But about five hundred years before Jesus’ time, the prophet Ezekiel had relayed a vision of the ‘Shekinah’ (the glory) of Yahweh leaving the temple, due to its corruption. However, Ezekiel also prophesied that one day the glory of God would return to the temple, and precisely from the same direction in which it had left: from the east (Ez. 43: 1-2). As the people saw Jesus approaching Jerusalem from the east, they would have remembered Ezekiel’s vision and would have begun to entertain the wild but thrilling idea that perhaps this Jesus was, in person, the glory of Yahweh returning to his dwelling place on earth. He was the new and definitive temple, the meeting-place of heaven and earth. And there is even more to see in the drama. As the rabbi from Nazareth entered Jerusalem on a donkey, no one could have missed the reference to a passage in the book of the prophet Zechariah: ‘Rejoice greatly, O daughter Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter Jerusalem! Lo, your king comes to you; triumphant and victorious is he, humble and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey’ (Zech. 9:9). A thousand years before the time of Jesus, David had taken possession of Jerusalem, dancing before the Ark of the Covenant. David’s son Solomon built the great temple in David’s city in order to house the Ark, and for that brief, shining moment, Israel was ruled by righteous kings. But then Solomon himself and a whole slew of his descendants fell into corruption. The people began to long for the return of the king, for the appearance of the true David, the one who would deal with the enemies of the nation and rule as king of the world. The Biblical authors expected Yahweh to become king, precisely through a son of David, who would enter the holy city, not as a conquering hero, riding a stately Arabian charger, but as a humble figure, riding a young donkey. Could anyone have missed that this was exactly what they were seeing on Palm Sunday? Jesus was not only the glory of Yahweh returning to his temple; he was also the new David, indeed Yahweh himself, reclaiming his city and preparing to deal with the enemies of Israel. And this is why Pontius Pilate, placing over the cross a sign in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew announcing that this crucified Jesus is King of the Jews, became, despite himself, the first great evangelist! So the message delivered on Palm Sunday, in the wonderfully coded and ironic language of the Gospel writers, continues to resonate: heaven and earth have come together; God is victorious; Jesus is Lord.”

Father Barron
Artwork by Gertrud Mueller Nelson

The texts that Christians typically read on Palm Sunday have become so familiar that we probably don’t sense their revolutionary power. But no first-century Jew would have missed the excitement and danger implicit in the coded language of the accounts describing Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem just a few days before his death. In Mark’s Gospel we hear that Jesus and his disciples ‘drew near to Jerusalem, to Bethphage and Bethany on the Mount of Olives.’ A bit of trivial geographical detail, we might be tempted to conclude. But about five hundred years before Jesus’ time, the prophet Ezekiel had relayed a vision of the ‘Shekinah’ (the glory) of Yahweh leaving the temple, due to its corruption. However, Ezekiel also prophesied that one day the glory of God would return to the temple, and precisely from the same direction in which it had left: from the east (Ez. 43: 1-2). As the people saw Jesus approaching Jerusalem from the east, they would have remembered Ezekiel’s vision and would have begun to entertain the wild but thrilling idea that perhaps this Jesus was, in person, the glory of Yahweh returning to his dwelling place on earth. He was the new and definitive temple, the meeting-place of heaven and earth. And there is even more to see in the drama. As the rabbi from Nazareth entered Jerusalem on a donkey, no one could have missed the reference to a passage in the book of the prophet Zechariah: ‘Rejoice greatly, O daughter Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter Jerusalem! Lo, your king comes to you; triumphant and victorious is he, humble and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey’ (Zech. 9:9). A thousand years before the time of Jesus, David had taken possession of Jerusalem, dancing before the Ark of the Covenant. David’s son Solomon built the great temple in David’s city in order to house the Ark, and for that brief, shining moment, Israel was ruled by righteous kings. But then Solomon himself and a whole slew of his descendants fell into corruption. The people began to long for the return of the king, for the appearance of the true David, the one who would deal with the enemies of the nation and rule as king of the world. The Biblical authors expected Yahweh to become king, precisely through a son of David, who would enter the holy city, not as a conquering hero, riding a stately Arabian charger, but as a humble figure, riding a young donkey. Could anyone have missed that this was exactly what they were seeing on Palm Sunday? Jesus was not only the glory of Yahweh returning to his temple; he was also the new David, indeed Yahweh himself, reclaiming his city and preparing to deal with the enemies of Israel. And this is why Pontius Pilate, placing over the cross a sign in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew announcing that this crucified Jesus is King of the Jews, became, despite himself, the first great evangelist! So the message delivered on Palm Sunday, in the wonderfully coded and ironic language of the Gospel writers, continues to resonate: heaven and earth have come together; God is victorious; Jesus is Lord.”

Father Barron

Artwork by Gertrud Mueller Nelson

March102014

Mystagogy of the Child

I was in a hurry, sweeping up items left unrestored by the children who had left the atrium.  I was in such a hurry I nearly missed, nearly swept away the simple statement left behind at the gestures of the Eucharist table.  There, in an act of mystagogy made visible, was the paper bread left over from a child’s enactment of the fraction.  Was it an accident that it was left as a heart on the The bread of lovepat…

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February42014

A Valediction to Lost Camp

It came.  Just two miles from my bedroom window, five irrigation wells brought their angry drone, like creditors seeking payment, to my sleepless ears.

It was the solitude of the ranch which had given me the balance to find my way graciously through…

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January312014
How do we know in a Catechesis of the Good Shepherd atrium that the Holy Spirit is the true teacher? We learn this by observing the environment.  Yesterday after the six year olds had left the atrium, I discovered that a child had brought the found coin (from the parable material of the same name) into the midst of the sheep in their fold.  Luke 15:3-10 acted out in silence by a child long before the classroom presentation  of the synthesis of these two parables.

How do we know in a Catechesis of the Good Shepherd atrium that the Holy Spirit is the true teacher? We learn this by observing the environment.  Yesterday after the six year olds had left the atrium, I discovered that a child had brought the found coin (from the parable material of the same name) into the midst of the sheep in their fold.  Luke 15:3-10 acted out in silence by a child long before the classroom presentation  of the synthesis of these two parables.

June202013
beingblog:

A big, tough samurai once went to see a little monk.



“Monk!”



He barked, in a voice accustomed to instant obedience.



“Teach me about heaven and hell!”



The monk looked up at the mighty warrior and replied with utter disdain,



“Teach you about heaven and hell? I couldn’t teach you about anything. You’re dumb. You’re dirty. You’re a disgrace, an embarrassment to the samurai class. Get out of my sight. I can’t stand you.”



The samurai got furious. He shook, red in the face, speechless with rage. He pulled out his sword, and prepared to slay the monk.
Looking straight into the samurai’s eyes, the monk said softly,



“That’s hell.”



The samurai froze, realizing the compassion of the monk who had risked his life to show him hell! He put down his sword and fell to his knees, filled with gratitude.
The monk said softly,



“And that’s heaven.”



Excerpted from Conscious Business: How to Build Value Through Values.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

beingblog:

A big, tough samurai once went to see a little monk.

“Monk!

He barked, in a voice accustomed to instant obedience.

“Teach me about heaven and hell!”

The monk looked up at the mighty warrior and replied with utter disdain,

“Teach you about heaven and hell? I couldn’t teach you about anything. You’re dumb. You’re dirty. You’re a disgrace, an embarrassment to the samurai class. Get out of my sight. I can’t stand you.”

The samurai got furious. He shook, red in the face, speechless with rage. He pulled out his sword, and prepared to slay the monk.

Looking straight into the samurai’s eyes, the monk said softly,

“That’s hell.”

The samurai froze, realizing the compassion of the monk who had risked his life to show him hell! He put down his sword and fell to his knees, filled with gratitude.

The monk said softly,

“And that’s heaven.”

Excerpted from Conscious Business: How to Build Value Through Values.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

2AM
childsmindinnovation:

“Creativity is the power to connect the seemingly unconnected.” ~ William Plomer
Photo: @childsmind

childsmindinnovation:

“Creativity is the power to connect the seemingly unconnected.” ~ William Plomer

Photo: @childsmind

2AM
Children are naturally drawn to caring for the environment around them and to delighting in its mysteries and its beauties.  Care of the environment activities in a Catechesis of the Good Shepherd atrium follow Montessori works.  Plant care works include leaf washing, plant watering, even tending a school garden, and all of these cultivate a life long sense of stewardship and compassion towards creation which is part of God’s plan for all of us.

Children are naturally drawn to caring for the environment around them and to delighting in its mysteries and its beauties.  Care of the environment activities in a Catechesis of the Good Shepherd atrium follow Montessori works.  Plant care works include leaf washing, plant watering, even tending a school garden, and all of these cultivate a life long sense of stewardship and compassion towards creation which is part of God’s plan for all of us.

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